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Latest HUSTLER Magazine cover issue
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December 2021

Featuring Marykate Moss
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Whoa, Mama! Sex and Pregnancy
Featured Article

Whoa, Mama! Sex and Pregnancy

Is it possible to keep up a satisfying sex life through morning sickness and fatigue? And how do you prioritize intimacy once the baby arrives? Read on for answers.

It’s common for sexual relationships to start off hot and heavy and then dip when things get busy or stressful. Often, these dips work themselves out: you start getting more sleep, you finish the work project. But few things affect your relationship—and your sex life—like having a baby. And if getting pregnant was challenging, as it often can be, it’s likely your sex life was already feeling tense before you got the good news. Is it possible to keep up a satisfying sex life through morning sickness and fatigue? And how do you prioritize intimacy once the baby arrives? 

First things first: all bodies are unique, so check with your doctor about what is and isn’t safe for your particular pregnancy, and make sure to be specific about the kind of sex you have. While it is generally safe to have sex during pregnancy and starting again at four to six weeks postpartum, that advice isn’t universal. But let’s say you have been given the greenlight for pregnancy sex—what should you consider? This is an excellent time to manage your expectations and go with the flow. Pregnancy hormones are wild, not to mention unpredictable. You could have a really rough first trimester and then feel like a switch has been flipped as soon as you begin the second one: your hair looks great, your appetite is back … and you’re super horny. If that’s the case, take advantage of it. You might have to make some modifications, like changing positions more frequently or staying off your back, but it doesn’t have to look radically different. If you’re the one who’s not pregnant, you might be worried about hurting your partner (or the baby). Trust is super important here. The best thing you can do is create a space where she can tell you what is and isn’t working for her, even if that changes day to day or week to week. (And don’t worry, you can’t poke the baby. I promise.) 

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